Understanding Travelers Philanthropy


Philanthropic Travel is NOT Voluntourism
December 16, 2008, 5:15 am
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PHILANTHROPIC TRAVEL IS NOT VOLUNTOURISM 

Philanthropic Travel is a fund raising learning experiencebetween a traveler/donor and a host/beneficiary which culminates in a 100% transparent monetary donation (NOT a gift in kind: ie. a pre-purchased ‘Book Box’) to the visited NGO/501c3:A Vacation in Generosity

Recent articles in Smart Money Magazine,  Wall Street JournalVoluntourism in Depth: Hip or Hype?,  World Hum: A Tourist With a Shovel and a Hoe and Canada’s National Post clearly define the profound differences between Voluntourism and Philanthropic Travel. 

Voluntourism is a service experience that donates a traveler’s labor and time.” -David Chamberlain, Founder: Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel 

Learn More:
Smart Money: What I did on my Volunteer Vacation
Voluntourism: Hip or Hype?
Wall Street Journal: Voluntourism Questioned
Canada’s National Post Newspaper: Philanthropic Travelers
Who gains the most from voluntourism?

Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel clients say…
The Fable of Stone Soup
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience

Philanthropic Travelers:
Teach your Children Well: Philanthropic Travel
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Barack Obama: Philanthropic Traveler
The One’s Who Do: Philanthropic Travelers
John Legend: Philanthropic Traveler

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“If you are coming to help me, you are wasting your time but if you are coming because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.” -Indigenous Saying   

Philanthropic Travel: Enlightened Experiences 

The Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel experience integrates indigenous local culture into every personalized experience we recommend. These personal introductions create authentic cross cultural friendships that generate trust, respect, and generous donations funding philanthropic travel projects worldwide. 

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Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide signs the United Nations Global Compact

Secretary-General
United Nations
New York, NY 10017
USA

Dear Mr. Secretary-General,

I am pleased to confirm that Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide supports the ten principles of the Global Compact in respect to human rights, labour rights, the protection of the environment and anti-corruption. With this communication, we express our intent to support and advance those principles within our sphere of influence. We commit to making the Global Compact and its principles part of the strategy, culture and day-to-day operations of our company and undertake to make a clear statement of this commitment -both to our employees, partners, clients and to the public. We support public accountability and transparency and will report on progress made in a public manner.

Sincerely yours,

Mr. David Chamberlain
Founder Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
~~~~

About The UN Global Compact
The Global Compact is a voluntary initiative that seeks to advance universal principles on human rights, labour, environment and anti-corruption through the active engagement of the corporate community, in cooperation with civil society and representatives of organized labour.

While the purposes of the United Nations and business differ widely -the UN focuses on peace, poverty reduction and the protection of human rights, and business on profit and growth –their objectives increasingly overlap. Building sustainable markets, combatting corruption, safeguarding the environment and ensuring social inclusion is increasingly important for the long-term value for business. It makes business sense for companies to invest in creating a sound environment in which to do business, to minimize risks and to harness new business opportunities by supporting emerging markets.

Direct benefits of participation include:
1. Global and local opportunities to dialogue and collaborate with other businesses, NGOs, labour, and governments on critical issues.
2. Exchange of experiences and good practices inspiring practical solutions and strategies to challenging problems.
3. Finding an entry-point through which companies can access the UN’s broad knowledge of development issues
4. Leveraging the UN’s global reach and convening power with governments, business, civil society and other stakeholders

In-direct benefits of participation include:
1. Increased legitimacy and license to operate, particularly in the developing world, because business practices are based on universal values.
2. Improved reputation and increasing brand value to consumers and investors “ specifically in the context of changing societal expectations.
3. Increased employee morale and productivity, and attracting and retaining the highest qualified employees
4. Improved operational efficiency, for instance through better use of raw materials and waste management.

The Global Compact has accumulated a substantial inventory of resources and tools that provide guidance to companies on addressing the issue areas covered by the principles.

* Human Rights
* Labour Standards
* Environment
* Anti-Corruption

The Global Compact’s Ten Principles in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption enjoy universal consensus and are derived from:

* The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
* The International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work
* The Rio Declaration on Environment and Development
* The United Nations Convention Against Corruption

The Global Compact asks companies to embrace, support and enact, within their sphere of influence, a set of core values in the areas of human rights, labour standards, the environment, and anti-corruption:

Human Rights
* Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and
* Principle 2: make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Labour Standards
* Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining;
* Principle 4: the elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour;
* Principle 5: the effective abolition of child labour; and
* Principle 6: the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.

Environment
* Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;
* Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and
* Principle 9: encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Anti-Corruption
* Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.

Learn More:
Collaboration creates Prosperity: Philanthropic Travel
Harvard Business Review Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector: Philanthropic Travel
Exquisite Safaris Corporate Donor Philanthropic Advisory Services
Creative Capitalism: Partner with Exquisite Safaris
The High-Purpose Company: Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
Exquisite Safaris clients say…
Travel Connoisseur Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
US Air Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel: Travel with a Heart
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
The Fable of Stone Soup
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
Are We Talking about Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not
Travel Philanthropy: Creating Peace
Fast Company Magazine on Philanthropic Travel
PersonalLifemedia.com on Philanthropic Travel
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia

Philanthropic Travelers:
The The One’s Who Do: Visionary Philanthropic Travelers
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Marc Gold 100 Friends Project
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Chellie Kew
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers

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A Rising Tide Lifts all Boats: Philanthropic Travel

When we act in ways that confirm our ideals, we make the ideal our reality.

Exquisite Safaris is a pioneer in Philanthropic Travel -our mission is to include philanthropic intent, inspiration, education & empowerment into every luxury travel experience we create. We believe that international travel should enlighten and enrich both traveler and host, while serving as a bridge over which passes friendship, peace, ancient wisdom, technological innovation and economic sustainability.

Historically, the worldwide travel industry has generated large profits and delivered culturally insulated travel experiences while ignoring the welfare of the local communities their clients visit. Those greedy corporate practices excluded economically challenged communities from sharing a reasonable percentage of the prosperity created when travelers visit their World Heritage Sites, enjoy their culture and recreate in their unique environments.

Today, there are old line travel companies announcing their philanthropic programs and advertising a token ‘giving back,’ trip (of the year) or new companies donating to charity if you sign up by X date -just so they can market to you.

Please support the travel industry’s rush to embrace the marketing value of Philanthropic Travel by gently reminding them to increase their commitments to community in at least direct proportion to their marketing campaign budgets. Defining and demanding the full potential of philanthropic travel lies quietly in the hands of you -the enlightened consumer.

“If you think you’re too small to have an impact, try going to bed with a mosquito.”
Anita Roddick

Learn More:
Exquisite Safaris clients say…
Travel Connoisseur Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
US Air Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel: Travel with a Heart
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
The Fable of Stone Soup
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
Are We Talking about Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not
Travel Philanthropy: Creating Peace
Fast Company Magazine on Philanthropic Travel
PersonalLifemedia.com on Philanthropic Travel
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia
When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy: New York Times

Philanthropic Travelers:
The The One’s Who Do: Visionary Philanthropic Travelers
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Marc Gold 100 Friends Project
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Chellie Kew
Rachael Paulson Philanthropic Traveler
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers

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Geotourism -sounds like Philanthropic Travel to me…

 


Understanding Geotourism…
If you are coming to help me, you are wasting your time but if you are coming because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.” -Indigenous Saying

The Exquisite Safaris philanthropic mission integrates a guided visit to a humanitarian outreach project into every private, luxury, epicurean experience we create. These personal introductions create authentic cross cultural friendships that generate trust, respect, and generous donations funding philanthropic travel projects worldwide. Collaboration creates Prosperity: Philanthropic Travel

Learn More:
New York Times on Philanthropic Travel
Exquisite Safaris clients say…
Travel Connoisseur Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
US Air Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel: Travel with a Heart
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
The Fable of Stone Soup
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
Are We Talking about Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not
Travel Philanthropy: Creating Peace
Fast Company Magazine on Philanthropic Travel
PersonalLifemedia.com on Philanthropic Travel
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia
When a Luxury Vacation Cultivates Philanthropy: New York Times

Philanthropic Travelers:
The The One’s Who Do: Visionary Philanthropic Travelers
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Marc Gold 100 Friends Project
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Chellie Kew
Rachael Paulson Philanthropic Traveler
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers



Travelers Philanthropy: We are the New Radicals -Julia Moulden

“I am very excited to be included in this important new book. It is full of innovative and meaningful entrepreneurial ideas: including a segment about “connecting at the heart,” the genesis of Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel. We are the New Radicals is scheduled for release by McGraw Hill on December 21, 2007.” –David Chamberlain

“Across America and around the world, thousands of people who have found success in their chosen careers are getting the call to do something more with their lives -to give something back to a world desperately in need of their help. And you don’t have to be a billionaire to do so..

Each day, we hear new stories of the rich and powerful doing good works: Gates and Buffett, Clinton and Branson, Oprah and Bono. But do you have to be worth billions to do so? No. Can mere mortals transform how they earn their daily bread?

Absolutely Inspiring: practical advice for making your life more meaningful!

We Are The New Radicals presents a new group of role models -ordinary men and women who have reinvented their work so that it provides more meaning, and helps them make a difference in the world. The book offers practical advice for you to do the same. Moulden describes the three paths to becoming a New Radical -innovation, entrepreneurship, and activism-and helps you answer fundamental questions such as “What are my motivations?” “What skills can I leverage?” “What might I do?” and ‘How do I get there from here?”

Eighty million boomers have reached middle age, and surveys show that the vast majority aren’t interested in traditional retirement -in fact, they foresee twenty or thirty active and productive years to come. For a significant proportion of this group, money isn’t the prime motivator behind their desire to continue working. Somehow, without conferring with one another, but informed by the same experiences and influences, these boomers have collectively chosen a single midlife occupation: saving the world.

The New Radicals talk about wanting roles that are personally meaningful, and that allow them to make a difference in the world. We’re eager to reinvent what we do, taking our energy and expertise in new directions. In fact, we believe that while what we’ve accomplished so far is valuable and important, our greatest contribution is yet to come.

The roles we have in mind -and the ones we’ve started to claim -have little to do with sixties radicalism. This is a kinder, gentler variation on a theme. New Radicals are constructive, hopeful, and positive -and determined to do whatever we can to make the world a better place…

ORDER NOW:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Borders

Learn More:
Visit the New Radicals Website
Travel Philanthropy: Creating Peace
The Fable of Stone Soup
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
Travel Connoisseur Magazine on Exquisite Safaris Philanthropic Travel Worldwide
Fast Company Magazine on Philanthropic Travel
PersonalLifemedia.com on Philanthropic Travel
DIY Foreign Policy: Philanthropic Travel
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
Affluent Parents Dedicated to Instilling Philanthropic Values in their Children
Giving while Living: The Deeper News About the New Philanthropy
Dr. Jeffrey Sachs on the Strategic Steps Out of Poverty
Are We Talking about Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not

Philanthropic Travelers:
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Marc Gold 100 Friends Project
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Chellie Kew
Rachael Paulson Philanthropic Traveler
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers

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Is Philanthropic Travel the same as Voluntourism?


Jane Kaye Bailey founder of The Butterfly Tree Project and Mukuni Village beneficiary.

“I appreciate the thoughtful points made throughout the following article. I encourage travelers to discern the differences that Philanthropic Travel and Voluntourism offer and to decide which experience appeals to them. Whether you prefer to spend a morning or afternoon connecting with locals as the guest of an Exquisite Safaris Humanitarian Partner (offering a tax deductible donation) and the balance vacationing (Philanthropic Travel); or prefer spending a morning or afternoon vacationing and the balance serving as a volunteer (Voluntourism) -valuable benefits accrue to all who collaborate.” –David Chamberlain

“Who gains the most from volun-tourism?” -Christina Jelly is a senior majoring in biochemistry and philosophy at the University of Arizona.

The University of Arizona sends record numbers of students to study abroad every year. Increasingly, international exchange is viewed as a vital component to the enrichment of our academic career. Not only does study abroad add dimension to our academic studies, but international travel broadens cultural perspectives and imparts invaluable lessons about the complexity and variety of our world.

The growth of study abroad and student exchange programs is illustrative of a broader phenomenon – not only are students venturing out of the country to study, but they are also traveling to developing countries to build schools for the poor, preserve threatened wildlife habitats and volunteer with AIDS patients.

And students are not alone. According to the Travel Industry Association of America, more than 55 million Americans have participated in so-called volunteer vacations – vacations including a jaunt in charitable activities abroad – and some 100 million Americans are contemplating similar trips.

The American commitment to volunteerism fused with our intrepid thirst for travel has created a burgeoning industry of volunteer-abroad service providers. This new brand of volunteer service differs from organizations like the Peace Corps in that it often thrusts untrained individuals into projects in developing countries for a much shorter time period.

Whether volunteers serve for two weeks or two years, they arguably provide a developing community with economic and social benefits, all free of The American commitment to volunteerism fused with our intrepid thirst for travel has created a burgeoning industry of volunteer-abroad service providers. charge and largely motivated by good will. Check out any of the glossy brochures distributed by the volunteer travel industry and you’ll find a diverse range of virtuous projects: community development, conservation, health improvement, teaching, etc.

Yet, volunteer tourists are often equally motivated by the opportunity to travel and feel the personal rewards of philanthropy. Personal satisfaction may be an indivisible element of altruistic acts, but how much are these short-term voluntourism projects aimed at satisfying the personal impulses of the volunteer rather than the needs of the project and the target community?

Many voluntourism providers are for-profit agencies, and as such their priority is to satisfy the consumer. Volunteer service providers like I-to-I and Cross-Cultural Solutions spend hefty sums developing projects that guarantee the volunteer moral satisfaction. Accordingly, they charge high prices for their services – a two-week teaching stint in Ghana can cost up to $1,495. That fee doesn’t even include the thousands of dollars you’ll need to pay for inoculations, flights, meals, in-country transport and visas.

When such agencies spend more time and resources satisfying the desires of volunteers, the sustainability and needs of the volunteer project come second to the caprices of wealthy tourists cum humanitarians. Admittedly, some part of the program fee goes toward the project, but the vast sums of money could probably be better spent on building pre-existing infrastructure within the target community or even right here in the United States.

Voluntourism promotes sentimental concern for the needy abroad that can blind us to the poverty at home. You don’t have to travel to Bolivia or Vietnam or Tanzania to find causes or individuals in need of assistance. Voluntourism can, however, potentially inculcate the pretentious fiction that the only needy beneficiaries of volunteer service are in developing countries. It’s easier that way: after our adrenaline rush of charity we can return to our privileged lives knowing we’ve satisfied our duty to help others.

Yet, the most successful community development and volunteer endeavors are the products of sustained and committed involvement -which a two-week spell cannot imitate. The brevity of volunteer travel programs that makes them so popular also detracts from their efficacy. Projects may be long enough to provide moral fulfillment to the individual volunteer, but they might be too fleeting to have matching benefits to the community.

Granted, the spirit of volunteer travel is noble: international volunteerism fosters solidarity, trust and reciprocity among diverse cultural groups and heralds global community cohesion. As students, when we embark on our voluntourism adventures, we should ensure programs prioritize the short- and long-term gains of the project over the wants of the volunteer. Similarly, we should pledge to use our unique assets and skills to generate tangible benefits for the community, not just impressive additions to our resumes.

Learn More:
Giving more convenient than Voluntourism
Philanthropic Travel or Voluntourism: Which one is right for your family?
Understanding Philanthropic Travel
Teaching your Children Philanthropy
Got more money than time? Philanthropic Travel
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
Giving while Living: The Deeper News About the New Philanthropy
Dr. Jeffrey Sachs on the Strategic Steps Out of Poverty
Are We Talking about Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not

Philanthropic Travelers:
Marc Gold’s 100Friends lead Philanthropic Travelers in Asia, Africa & South America
Visionary Philanthropic Traveler Chellie Kew
Rachael Paulson Philanthropic Traveler
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers

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Travelers Philanthropy: Be of Service

Travelers Philanthropy in Otavalo, Ecuador with Exquisite Safaris

Each of us is more than capable of helping the world, despite our fears and limitations and the uncertainty that holds us back. It is commonly accepted that it is impossible to make a difference without unlimited funding or free time, yet most healing, cleansing, and spreading of joy is accomplished in a matter of minutes. If we vow to make the world a better place one day at a time, the true significance of small good deeds reveals itself to us. We come to see that we can be of service without dedicating our lives to recognized charities or giving up the pleasures we enjoy. The warmth we feel when we help the world is only a tiny part of the affirmative transformations that take place when we make altruism a part of everyday existence.

We make our homes, workplaces, communities, and countries better and brighter when we think positive thoughts that echo outward, give donations of time or money, smile at everyone we meet, and lend those in need of aid our assistance. As we learn, we inadvertently improve the universe because we can only be truly involved when we are informed. Even enthusiastically sharing ideas with others generates positive energy that then serves as the motivation for more tangible change. Selfless and helpful deeds remind us that we exercise some degree of control over a world that can seem chaotic at times. Even the smallest of such deeds is a demonstration of the fact that we are capable of changing the world in a positive way. So much negative energy is generated by the suffering, pain, and close-mindedness we are regularly exposed to, but we can counteract it in a constructive way by thinking and acting altruistically when opportunities to do so arise.

Helping the world often takes no more than a moment, just a wish for the world is a beautiful gesture and can be done by even the busiest of people effortlessly. The gift you give each day need not be grand or attention-worthy because the broader benefits are the same no matter the literal repercussions. Once a day, you can affect reality, and you can reap the rewards of knowing that you are making the world a better place, day by day.

Learn More:
DailyOm
Understanding Travelers Philanthropy
Fast Company Magazine on Travelers Philanthropy
Philanthropic Traveler funded High School opens near Victoria Falls, Zambia
The Fable of Stone Soup
My First Philanthropic Travel Experience
Affluent Parents Dedicated to Instilling Philanthropic Values in their Children
Giving while Living: The Deeper News About the New Philanthropy
Dr. Jeffrey Sachs on the Strategic Steps Out of Poverty
Are We Talking about Travelers Philanthropy Yet? No, We Are Not

Philanthropic Travelers:
Milton & Fred Ochieng: Philanthropic Travelers
Jane Kaye- Bailey: Philanthropic Traveler
Richard Branson: Philanthropic Traveler
Angelina Jolie: Philanthropic Traveler
Karen Jacobsen: Philanthropic Traveler
Oprah Winfrey: Philanthropic Traveler
Palm Beach Life Magazine: Philanthropic Travelers

Why Exquisite Safaris?

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